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CASLAB@PSYCH.UMASS.EDU

Phone: 413-354-0053

Location: 303G, I, and K  in Tobin Hall
135 Hicks Way
Amherst, MA 01003
Parking: Where to park. 

ACES: Attitudes, Coping, Emotions, and Sensations

Although many young adults engage in self-injury without any suicidal intent, this behavior is associated with a number of problematic outcomes, including greater risk for suicide. Research has helped us to understand who is at risk for self-injury, but we know less about when people are at greatest risk. It is possible that negative beliefs about oneself interact with stressful situations to create greater risk. This study aims to help identify the joint and interactive influences of beliefs about oneself and stressful life events to predict urges for self-injury among young adults. To participate in this research, please click here.

LEAP: Learning, Emotions, and Personality

We know that certain personality traits, such as borderline personality traits, increase the tendency to engage in risky behaviors. Although we often think of these behaviors as due to impulsivity, impulsivity itself is a broad and multi-faceted idea.This study focuses on specific aspects of impulsivity and decision making that may best predict risky behaviors. To participate in this research, please click here.

DBT FASTER

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an effective treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD), but we do not know whether the full 12 months of treatment is necessary. Therefore, in collaboration with Dr. Shelley McMain at Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Dr. Janice Kuo at Ryerson University in Toronto and Dr. Alex Chapman at Simon Fraser University, we are comparing 6 months​ versus 12 months of DBT in a study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). This study is being conducted in Toronto and Vancouver in Canada. For information on participating in this study, please click here for Vancouver,  and here for Toronto. 

Project RISE: Regulation, Interpersonal, and Self-Harm Experiences

This study seeks to understand how beliefs about self-injury affect daily engagement in this harmful behavior. This CIHR-funded study is being conducted in collaboration with Drs. Kim Gratz and Matt Tull at the University of Toledo, and Dr. Alex Chapman at Simon Fraser University. For information on participating in this study, please click here for Vancouver, and here for Toledo. 

Some Current Studies